Complete GYOKKO-RYU KOSSHIJUTSU with MATS HJELM

  $24.99

Gyokko-ryu Kosshijutsu

  $24.99

All 51 Gyokko-ryu techniques on 4 files in HD quality, total playing time is 48 minutes. 2.3 Gb (H.264, AAC, 1280x720p)

This was filmed at the Bujinkan Kaigozan Dojo during the late fall of 2016 and early 2017. The theme was Gyokko-ryu Kosshijutsu.

There is no verbal instructions on this film. Each technique is demonstrated several times from all angles. For more information about this ryu-ha click here! Please notice there is several sub-pages to this page with more information, also including an errata for the Densho book published by Hatsumi Soke.

Techniques is demonstrated from several angles including slowmotion speed. There is no verbal instructions, we highly suggest you get the Unarmed Fighting Techniques of the Samurai book (what I call the Densho Book by Hatsumi Soke). This book have all Taijutsu techniques from all the Bujinkan ryu-ha described, it is a must have for all studying the Bujinkan arts.

玉虎流 骨指術
GYOKKŌ-RYŪ KOSSHIJUTSU

0. 基本型 KIHON KATA (23 techniques) Duration: 11:03 min / 597,7 MB on disk

1. 上略の巻 JŌ RYAKU NO MAKI (12 techniques) Duration: 13:36 min / 703 MB on disk
2. 中略の巻 CHŪ RYAKU NO MAKI (8 techniques) Duration: 13:55 min / 720 MB on disk
3. 下略の巻 GE RYAKU NO MAKI (8 techniques) Duration: 09:41 min / 303,6 MB on disk

Each file contains chapter markers for all the techniques for easy skipping to the technique you want to study. You can import the files to your iTunes library and sync it to your iPhone or iPad, or stream to the AppleTV. You can import it to any other library that supports the mp4 format and put it on your Android phone or tablet. Or you can play it directly from your hard drive, streaming to your TV etc.

Title: Complete Gyokko-ryu Kosshijutsu with Mats Hjelm
Instructors: Mats Hjelm
Theme: Gyokko-ryu Kosshijutsu Kihon kata, Jo Ryaku, Chu Ryaku, Ge Ryaku
Recorded: Recorded in Kaigozan Dojo, Stockholm February 2017

Kind: Apple MPEG-4 movie
Size: 2,3 GB on disk
Dimensions: 1280×720
Codecs: 3GPP Text, H.264, AAC, Photo – JPEG
Duration: 48 min

Posted in budoshop, Contributors Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Ninja True: The Takagi House

高木 Takagi. photo by Michael Glenn
Based on a lucky tip from one of my favorite blogs, Japan This!, I explore deep into Tokyo’s history from when the Samurai held the high ground of the yamanote in old Edo. What I found was surprise for me and for any Bujinkan student.




https://youtu.be/Dy0Y2MGVbCs

I got off the at the right train stop and started walking through the neighborhood. But my map and these shadowed early morning streets didn’t make me very confident I was on the right path. I was about to enter a konbini to ask for directions, when a police officer on a bicycle rode up.

He parked outside the 7-11 and went inside. I followed. My Japanese is not awesome, but I have had good luck with getting directions from Japanese police in the past. So while he was browsing the potato chips, I approached him like the dumb tourist I was.

He seemed a bit bothered, but gave me the “chotto matte,” so he could finish his shopping. He seemed to be buying drinks and snacks for a few people. I went outside next to his bike.

He put everything in the handlebar basket and motioned for me to follow him. We walked a couple of blocks to the kouban. There were about 5-6 police bustling around the street corner. My cop took me up to a map on the wall.

Suddenly, we had an audience. ALL of the officers were very curious to see what we were looking for. As he tried to find something on the map, each one interrupted with their own attempt to help. It was a combination of testing their English on me (which was not good) and trying to explain to him where he should look on the map.

As I stood in the huddle of six cops, I was embarrassed and amused by all the trouble my inquiry had created. A crowd was gathering on the street corner, and most of the locals were staring at me. Then the boss arrived.

An officer that was much older came out of the kouban and all of the others stopped talking. He calmly looked at the address I held in my hand. He punched a finger like a dart into the map and handed the address back to me. He told me that I could not go inside the place. I said I knew that, and I just wanted to take a photo of the outside.

Then a funny thing happened. He started scolding the original officer for not knowing what this place was. I mean, it has been there for more than 400 years and all. Like I said, my Japanese is not great, but I could hear the dressing down in any language.

I thanked them, and started walking. But the senior officer would not allow me to go. He continued scolding as the original cop was unloading the groceries from his bike basket. He pointed down the street and was giving him directions. And orders to escort me, apparently.

Now I walked beside the officer. And he walked his bike. I apologized to him. He waved it off.

That was a long 15 minute walk. There was the language barrier. But maybe just a bit of touch of annoyed policeman. It has a different flavor than annoyed police in America.

He dropped me off at the historic site with one more admonition that I could not go inside. Then he got on his bicycle and pedaled away to leave me alone in the quiet neighborhood.  I spent a little time observing the old architecture of this Samurai house.

On the main gate was the name plate of Takagi.  This had really driven my visit. You may know that one of the main schools of our Bujinkan study is 高木揚心流 Takagi Yoshin Ryū. And the fact that this was an old Samurai house made me dream of a connection.


The Takagi family has been living in this residence for more than 400 years! I know that Takagi is a common name in Japan. But I can dream. Anyhow I took some pics and walked around the old gate.

Then came a surprise! And old man called to me from the other side of the gate. He peered through the slot and motioned me to a smaller, side gate. He unlatched it and slid it open and beckoned me inside!

This old man, maybe a member of the Takagi family, made it clear I could give myself a tour of the property. He told me to let myself out when I was done. Then he went back inside the house.

I am always blown away by the generosity of the Japanese people. So I spent about 30 minutes quietly taking pictures and admiring the architecture. It seemed like there were a number of families living on the property, so I didn’t want to overstay my welcome or intrude too much.

I tried to imagine what old Edo must’ve felt like inside and outside these walls hundreds of years ago. I let myself back out the side gate. And wandered back into the streets of modern Tokyo.

I must thank the police. It occurred to me later that the older policeman who seemed very familiar with this property might have even called ahead to let the family know I was coming over. That may be why I was allowed to enter. I also must thank Japan This! for finding this, and for all of the other wonderful reports on the blog.
Posted in Contributors

Evade Without Evading: Bujinkan Strategies of Control Part 4

五條天神社で、お焚き上げ otakiage preparations at Gojoten jinja. photo Michael Glenn
Last time I attacked Hatsumi Sensei, he disappeared. It left me very confused. But Hatsumi Sensei described it this way,
“This is a way to control. You’ve got to be a shadow. He won’t believe that I’m avoiding.“
The next day I ran some errands in Tokyo. The local shrines were already beginning their new year’s preparations. I stopped and stared at a pile of wood that was made ready for the お焚き上げ otakiage bonfire. Fire can purify and burn away problems from the previous year.

 I kept thinking about what happened in yesterday’s class with Soke. How did he disappear? That was what I was stuck on.

I thought, next time I get that chance, I am going to really try to hit him and see what happens. If anything goes wrong, the year is almost over and I can throw myself into the fire.

In Hatsumi Sensei’s next class, he asked me to punch at him. I decided this time I would go for it! I really tried and he disappeared. Then I was kind of hanging there in space. I felt a finger (I think it was his thumb) very light on the back of my hand. And somehow this threw me. He said,
“This muto dori feeling is very important. One finger. Just kind of pass by. This way of moving through the kukan is important.”
What Hatsumi Sensei was teaching was how to control. I discovered much later that this type of control arises neither by evading or NOT evading. It is hidden in between.

Hatsumi Sensei told us over and over, “Yokeru yokenai!” This is getting out of the way without getting out of the way. Not evading while evading.

This is hard to understand. Obviously you don’t want to get hit by your opponent. If you can’t evade or stand still, then what?

Hatsumi Sensei gave us a clue when he said “人間の意識からない ningen no ishiki kara nai.” Don’t do it with your own human intention.

That is the problem with evading. The human intention or thought takes too long. Soke said, “I'm not avoiding. Not thinking.”

This creates a special kind of distance that is connected to nature. It is not something that you came up with yourself. If you're trying to get out of the way, then you won't be able to control anything because you are preoccupied.

You don’t want to get hit, or cut by the weapon. But if you try to evade, or try NOT to evade, you will fail. No matter how good you are. There is always someone better, faster, sneakier. So the answer lies in between evading and not evading.

What is in between? Connection and zero. This has long been how Soke describes his budo,
“You control him like this. This is the theme. Connect these ideas. It becomes zero. Connecting zero.”
You can find the middle way between evading and not evading by merging with this universal space (Hatsumi Sensei said shizento and uchuuto). Then he called it a 玉 gyoku or egg ( I don’t know what that means, but if you do, please contact me).

Your whole body becomes like the mist. I wouldn’t believe any of this, except I tried to hit Soke and that is what happened. I have been holding onto that feeling ever since.

In my own training I have discovered that in the moment you evade, you break the connection and become trapped in your efforts to evade. You escape this through play. Play sets you free. Hatsumi Sensei described it,
“This is the idea of freedom. This is the strength of freedom. The power of freedom. Because it's very wide, it's very vast (宇宙 uchuu). You want to go up into space.”
The flames from the bonfire rise above the shrine, sending sparks past the 鳥居 torii, and up among the stars. I would burn with them. There I learn the freedom of this distance.
Posted in Contributors

Human Bonsai!

bonsai1Over the last twenty three years here in Japan, I often have the pleasure and honor to translate for my teacher Masaaki Hatsumi Soke. Often a student has a question that he would like to ask. It is a always a delight to be able to help facilitate communication between teacher and student. So many questions and so many unexpected answers! One episode comes to mind.

A student asks, “Why are some people friendly to your face but then are hurtful and mean behind your back?”.

Sensei replies nonchalantly, “that is just how people are made.”. As I translate, I can see the look of confusion cross the students` faces. I too am at a bit of a loss. So the question is asked again and once again the answer is the same,”that is just how people are made.”.  Then Sensei looks up into space and asks me, “Paul, have you ever seen a bonsai?”. (small miniature Japanese art trees)I nod my head “yes”. In fact, I had just taken some friends to a bonsai garden the day before so I was a bit surprised by the sudden question about bonsai. He continues, “it is like a bonsai, people are made. You can make a person any way. But it is not natural. You would not go to a forest and find a bonsai. It is not a natural state. But you can twist a bonsai into any shape you want. People are the same.”

How true! Just the prior day I was remarking on the branches of the bonsai. Each branch wrapped with wire and forced to go this way or that way. Every branch! bonsai3Each branch wrapped in wire and forced to take a seemingly natural posture or kamae. And how unnatural it really is. We, too, as humans, each being wrapped in the culture, politics, education, religions and beliefs of those around us and society. Some people wrapped as capitalists, some marxists, some Christians, some Muslim. But all are being bound by the conditioning of the environment and society. Then what you think are your own thoughts can betray you.  In a tragic conclusion, we often we take a kamae or stance for or against another wrapped up in a different shape. Both unaware of the wires that trap them in this position.

Unwrapping these wires and constraints is an important step in the practice of Ninjustu. A true ninja will become free and his tree will grow strong and pure into a natural state in accordance with the natural state of his existence. A Ninja is able to explore his true essence in infinite space. That is why in the Go Jou or Five Precepts as taught by my teacher, a constant diligence and watchfulness to your true path is essential. First become aware of where you are now. What shape are you now? When your shape become visible, start unwrapping!

Posted in Contributors Tagged with:

Kan Nin Dokuso (part one)

kanninpot

Artist: Paul Masse 2007. Inscription: 天上天下唯我独

“In the all the heavens and earth, only I am exalted!”

Kan Nin Dock Son is a phrase you may hear around the Bujinkan dojo this year. Is it the theme for the year? Maybe, maybe not. Who knows?! But whether it is a theme or not is really not important, it should give you something to ponder and explore this year in addition to your continued practice of the physical movement and techniques. Kan Nin 貫忍, steadfast and single-minded perseverance all the way. Doku Son 独尊、to be revered or exalted. It most likely refers to a story of the Buddha. The story is, when he was born, the Buddha took seven steps and pointed one finger up and one finger down and exclaimed, “In the all the heavens and earth, only I am exalted!”.  What is this elusive I? Some think of it as me, my name, age ect. But you would lose some of the poetry. Who are you when your name, age, social status are stripped away. Going deeper, who are you when the body is stripped away and the mind faded and gone, and even your conscience vanishes like smoke after a fire?Maybe you have heard the Gokui (inner teachings) Persevere the body, Persevere the heart, and Persevere the conscience.

Your body had plopped out of this earth and it will dissolve back into the earth. No matter how good they wrap you like a mummy! But what of a natural energy? A power of nature that drives the seasons, sings thru a myriad of creatures? This power that keeps the clouds drifting and the water flowing, and an infinite number of stars alight? This natural power, the natural power of life is what we must become aware. When you have persevered thru all, this power will shine. Hatsumi Sensei once said to me, “it is like in the movies, when someone opens a treasure box, and their face is lit up by the golden light of the treasure.”. I really like this image. This is the treasure of Nin or Ninpo, 忍宝。 Kan Nin will help to uncover it. Be like Indiana Jones and go treasure hunting. The treasure is so near! When you uncover it, you won’t need to be and air bender or water bender or fire bender. You will know that you have been bending them all the time!

Posted in Contributors Tagged with:
Budoshop DVDs & stuff

Recent Posts

Archives

  • An error has occurred, which probably means the feed is down. Try again later.

Our Recent Tweets